Fernando Rosa

Spain
www.fernandorosa.cl

Fernando Rosa was born in Valparaíso, Chile. He began his photographic activity in 2001, after studying several photography workshops and becoming an Audiovisual Communicator. Winner of the photography scholarship of Fondo de las Artes (Chile) FONDART in the years 2007-2009-2010-2015. He has exhibited in Chile, Mexico, Spain, England and Belgium. He currently lives in Valencia, where he is studying the Master in Art and Technical Photography at the Polytechnic University of Valencia.

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

This place is part of Chile’s collective unconscious. For over forty years, most of this community were practically isolated not only from the rest of the country, but also from the historical events of the 20th Century. Founded by German immigrants in 1961, would eventually become economically self-sufficient, housing over 500 people within its borders. During this time human rights were openly and callously violated and small children were abused. The community has had to face challenges they never thought they would, challenges no one prepared them for. 
The objective was to document the last ten years of Villa Baviera, and its ongoing struggle to survive in today's world.

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The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Symbolic stone located at the access point to Villa Baviera

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Freihaus, entry hall into the place that once housed the room of former Villa Baviera leader, Paul Schäfer

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Jürgen Szugerlies, son of a settler. During the years the community was secluded from the outside world; he tried to escape many times, but was unsuccessful. Today, he lives and works in the Villa Baviera tourism complex

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Jürgen Szugerlies, son of a settler. During the years the community was secluded from the outside world; he tried to escape many times, but was unsuccessful. Today, he lives and works in the Villa Baviera tourism complex

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Old medical emergency transportation system for crossing the Perquilauquén River. This used to be medical transportation for nearby communities. It is currently still used for workers to cross the river

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Sergio Contreras, due to health problems, he arrived as a child to receive medical treatment at the Colonia Dignidad hospital. He is alive today thanks to the help of the community presently living in Villa Baviera

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Museum of Villa Baviera on the village

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Hermut Bohnau, son of settlers. He is one of the few young men born during the community’s seclusion period, for it was forbidden to have children

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

The Spa of the hotel, tourism of Villa Baviera

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Paseo de Anna (The Anna Trail). It was named this way to honor the death of one of the first settlers to pass away in Villa Baviera

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Iris Leiva and Sergio Campos, two children adopted by settlers. Formerly named Iris Seewald and Arnold Blanck, they decided to return to the old names they had as children and are currently writing a new page in their family history. Here, they are shown with their first son, Freddy Campos Leiva

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Iris Leiva and Sergio Campos, two children adopted by settlers. Formerly named Iris Seewald and Arnold Blanck, they decided to return to the old names they had as children and are currently writing a new page in their family history. Here, they are shown with their first son, Freddy Campos Leiva

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Helga Bohnau, Horst Schaffrik and their son Benjamin. They were one of the first couples to get married after Villa Baviera was opened

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

Helga Bohnau, Horst Schaffrik with their two children

The Non-Place: Villa Baviera

The Villa Baviera Hotel
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